Vinkla not Vankler

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Vinkla, MB

The following is a news release issued by the City of Vinkla subsequent to an erroneous report in the Daily Bonnet that Winkler had changed its name to Vankler

CITY OF VINKLA


Press Release

For immediate release

Winkler changes name to Vinkla not Vankler

A recent report in the Daily Bonnet erroneously reported that Winkler had changed it’s name to Vankler.

We are appalled that the Daily Bonnet, who had a representative present at the council meeting where the issue was discussed was not able to file a factual report.

Although the name Vankler was brought up during our discussions is was quickly dismissed as several council members felt that Vankler could very easily be mispronounced by non Plautdietsch speaking people as Wankler or even worse Wanker which has very  negative and derogatory connotations. For that reason the more traditional, “Vinkla” was agreed upon.

The same article also suggested that council was petitioning the City of Winnipeg to change its name to Vanapag.  Although there have been informal discussions with the City of Winnipeg  our suggestion was that  they consider changing their name to Febräaakjestaut in keeping with their designation as a high crime city.

Council does not impune negative motives to the Daily Bonnet.  It may well just be another example of how people from jantsied who employee a different pronunciation of some Plautdietsch words simply got it wrong,  again.

In keeping with Mennonite tradition, we forgive them.

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Right to bare arms not supported by all

A recent post by the Daily Bonnet which depicted a young woman with bare arms, claimed that American Mennonites who dress in that manner are simply exercising their right under the 2nd Amendment.

However not all Mennonites are in agreement.

Elder Peter Siemens, head of the Sommerfelder Church in Bolivia was quick to react.  “I think it is shameful, bare arms, no head covering and smiling yet even,” said Siemens.

When asked if he felt that the photo in the Daily Bonnet could have a  potential  negative influence on his congregation in Bolivia Siemens indicated that was unlikely, “We don’t have the Internet here and we are not planning on getting it either so the chances of anyone down here seeing that are remote”.

When asked about his understanding of how the Internet worked Siemens said, “I saw it once when I was in Asuncion, Paraguay  and it was not good, not good.”

Siemens went on to say that he will do whatever he can to protect his congregation from the Internet and other similar modern evil influences.  He concluded with, “We did not leave Canada to go to Mexico, and then on to Paraguay and finally to Bolivia only to let that happen to us.”

The interview with Siemens was conducted via cell phone.